Sea levels on the east coast rose more in the 20th century than in the last 2,000 years

A new study may confirm that Atlantic City and other areas in southern New Jersey will one day be flooded by rising sea levels.

A team led by Rutgers University found that sea levels along the east coast of America rose faster in the 20th century than in all of the last 2,000 years – with the fastest wave in Garden State.

The researchers analyzed levels at six locations in Connecticut, New York, New Jersey and North Carolina, revealing locations where sea levels rose 1.4 inches from 1900 to 2000.

However, southern New Jersey had the fastest rates with about 0.63 inches per decade in certain areas and 0.6 inches in others.

Rising sea levels, according to researchers, are contributing to melting ice and warming oceans as a result of climate change.

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Here is the same footage a month later, which highlights a flooded landscape from rising sea levels

Scientists have long speculated that Atlantic City and other areas in southern New Jersey will one day be submerged by rising sea levels, and a new study may confirm this claim. Pictured is Edwin B. Forsythe, New Jersey National Wildlife Refuge, showing how sea levels have risen

“The study first examined phenomena that contributed to sea level change over the years 2000 at six coastal locations, using a sea level budget,” the team shared in a statement.

The researchers decided to use a seal-level calculation, which improves understanding of the processes that drive sea level changes.

Processes are global, regional (including geological, such as soil subsidence), and local, such as groundwater withdrawal.

Jennifer S. Walker, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, said: ‘A long-term thorough understanding of sea level changes in localities is imperative for regional and local planning and responding to future sea ​​level rise. ‘

The researchers analyzed levels at six locations in Connecticut, New York, New Jersey and North Carolina, revealing locations where sea levels rose 1.4 inches from 1900 to 2000.

The researchers analyzed levels at six locations in Connecticut, New York, New Jersey and North Carolina, revealing locations where sea levels rose 1.4 inches from 1900 to 2000.

“By learning how different processes differ over time and contribute to sea level change, we can more accurately estimate future contributions in specific locations.”

Climate change has become the main focus of the scientific community in recent years, which has also affected their views of low-lying islands, cities and countries.

With glaciers melting and oceans warming, sea levels make such locations more vulnerable to flooding and storm damage.

The Great Hurricane of 1938 plowed New England, engulfed Long Island and Connecticut.

The storm, which is considered the worst in the history of New England, left 564 dead, over 1,700 wounded and destroyed about 15,000 infrastructure.

A more recent event occurred in 2012 when Hurricane Sandy broke through southern New Jersey to Long Island, New York and left nothing but destruction on its way.

It caused $ 70 billion in damage, cut off electricity to 8.5 million Americans and destroyed about 650,000 homes.

And scientists link these devastating events to rising sea levels.

‘Most sea-level budget studies are global and are limited to the 20th and 21st centuries, according to a recent study.

‘Researchers led by the Rutgers have estimated sea-level budgets over longer time frames over 2,000 years.

‘The aim was to better understand how the processes driving the sea level have changed and how they could shape future changes, and this sea level calculation method could be applied to other locations around the world.’

A recent event occurred in 2012 when Hurricane Sandy broke through southern New Jersey to Long Island in New York City and left nothing in its path except destruction.  Pictured are the aftermath of a super storm Sandy in Atlantic City

A recent event occurred in 2012 when Hurricane Sandy broke through southern New Jersey to Long Island in New York City and left nothing in its path except destruction. Pictured are the aftermath of a super storm Sandy in Atlantic City

Using a statistical model, the scientists developed budgets for six locations, dividing sea level records into global, regional and local components.  They found that regional landslides - the sinking of land since the Laurent ice sheet retreated thousands of years ago - have dominated each site's budget for the past 2,000 years.

Using a statistical model, the scientists developed budgets for six locations, dividing sea level records into global, regional and local components. They found that regional landslides – the sinking of land since the Laurent ice sheet retreated thousands of years ago – have dominated each site’s budget for the past 2,000 years.

Using a statistical model, the scientists developed budgets for six locations, dividing sea level records into global, regional and local components.

They found that regional landslides – the sinking of land since the Laurent ice sheet retreated thousands of years ago – have dominated each site’s budget for the past 2,000 years.

Other regional factors, such as ocean dynamics, and locality-specific local processes, such as groundwater withdrawals that help the country sink, contribute significantly less to any budget and vary over time and location.

HAZELNUTS AND MELTING ICE WOULD HAVE A “DRAMATIC IMPACT” ON GLOBAL SEA LEVELS

Global sea levels could rise up to 3 meters if the Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica collapses.

Sea level rise is threatening cities from Shanghai to London, to the lowlands of Florida or Bangladesh, as well as entire states like the Maldives.

For example, in the UK, an increase of 2 meters or more can cause areas such as Hull, Peterborough, Portsmouth and parts of East London and the Thames estuary to be flooded.

The collapse of the glacier, which could begin in decades, could also flood major cities like New York and Sydney.

Parts of New Orleans, Houston and Miami in the southern United States would also be particularly affected.

A 2014 study examined by a union of concerned scientists examined 52 sea level indicators in communities across the United States.

It found that tidal floods would increase dramatically in many locations on the East and Gulf Coast, based on a conservative estimate of projected sea level rise based on current data.

The results showed that most of these communities will experience a sharp increase in the number and severity of tidal floods over the coming decades.

By 2030, more than half of the 52 communities studied are projected to experience an average of at least 24 tides per year in exposed areas, assuming moderate projections of sea level rise. Twenty of these communities may see tripling or multiple times in tidal floods.

Some of the largest increases in flood frequency are expected on the Mediterranean coast. Places like Annapolis, Maryland, and Washington, DC can expect more than 150 tidal floods a year, and 80 or more tidal and tidal floods can be seen at several locations in New Jersey.

In the UK, at two meters (6.5 feet) by 2040, large parts of Kent would be almost completely submerged, according to the results of a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in November 2016.

Areas on the south coast like Portsmouth as well as Cambridge and Peterborough would also be hit hard.

Cities and towns around the mouth of the Humber, such as Hull, Scunthorpe, and Grimsby, would also experience intense flooding.

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