Counties of North Wales with the highest and lowest rates of Covid infection

Anglesey on Monday recorded the highest rates of infection with the Covid virus in Wales, as it continues to worry about the spread of the virus on the island.

The latest public health data in Wales shows that on February 10, 15 cases were reported in Anglesey, giving an infection rate of 21.4 cases per 100,000 people.

Five cases were reported yesterday in the county of Rhosybol, Marianglas & Moelfre, which is the second-largest daily number in Wales.

On February 10, Flintshire had the second worst daily infection rate with 19.2 cases per 100,000 people.

A total of 30 cases were reported in the county yesterday.

The focal points here were four cases in each Holywell & Bagillt district, Buckley South and Connah’s Quay South & Northop Hall.

Anglesey also recorded the highest positivity rate in the country, at 19.2%, followed by Flintshire with 15.3%. This is the proportion of people who tested positive for Covid-19.

Only two cases were reported in Denbighshire yesterday, equating to an infection rate of 2.1 cases per 100,000 people.

This was the second lowest in Wales after Ceredigion, where no cases were confirmed yesterday.

Figures Covid-19 for February 10 (latest available)

  • Anglesey: 15 cases (21.4 cases per 100,000 people)
  • Conwy: 8 cases, (6.8 cases per 100,000 people)
  • Denbighshire: 2 cases (2.1 cases per 100,000 people)
  • Flintshire: 30 cases (19.2 cases per 100,000 people)
  • Gwynedd: 11 cases (8.8 cases per 100,000 people)
  • Wrexham: 18 cases (14 cases per 100,000 people)
  • Powys: 24 cases (18.1 cases per 100,000 people)
  • Ceredigion: 0 cases


The woman is wearing a FFP2 class face mask

It was revealed last week that a small number of staff at the Tesco Holyhead Extra store were positive for the virus.

And yesterday, North Wales Live reported on the tragic events at the Fairways Newydd Nursing and Dementia Center, Llanfairpwll, where 12 residents died and 54 staff had positive results.

Daily coronavirus figures must be treated with caution, as figures can fluctuate, obscuring broader trends.

Week-to-week analysis shows that infection rates fell last week in most counties in Wales.



Police stopped 2,500 cars in the region last week, one visitor from Wigan was sent on alert after saying he wanted to visit the Talacre lighthouse.

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The exceptions were rural Powys, where case levels remained static last week at 98.2 cases per 100,000 people.

The latest figures show that an outbreak has occurred in the normally quiet Knighton & Presteigne district: 10 cases were reported on Friday alone – 6.2% of all cases registered there since the start of the pandemic.

A further four cases were reported in Four Crosses & Guilsfield County.

Seven-day infection rate trend (February 1-7 compared to February 8-14)

  • Anglesey: February 1 – 7 – 164.2; 8-14. February – 101.4
  • Conwy: February 1 – 7 – 138.2; February 8 – 14 – 56.3
  • Denbighshire: February 1 – 7 – 84-6; 8-14. February – 44.9
  • Flintshire: February 1 – 7 – 173; 8-14. February – 92.2
  • Gwynedd: February 1 – 7 – 87.5; February 8 – 14 – 69.8
  • Wrexham: February 1 – 7 – 199.3; 8-14. February – 89.7
  • Powys: February 1 – 7 – 98.2; 8-14. February – 98.2
  • Ceredigion: February 1 – 7 – 38.5; 8-14. February – 17.9

The latest public health figures in Wales reveal that 363 new Covid-19 cases have been confirmed in the last 24-hour period, bringing the total to 199,518 since the start of the pandemic.

The number of people who died of coronavirus in Wales within a month of a positive test is now 5,137.

The infection rate across Wales is currently 91.6 per 100,000 people, based on seven days to 10 February.

It is the lowest since September.

Two more Covid-19-related deaths have been reported in North Wales.

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