A fossil of an extinct tree climbing kangaroo found in Australia

This brochure, published by Murdoch University on March 23, 2021, shows the preservation of the skull of a newly identified fossil tree climbing kangaroo (Congruus kuhneri) from the Nullarbor Plain in Western Australia. (Photo / Agencies)

The most notable thing about near-perfect fossils was not that they belonged to 40-pound kangaroos that had mysteriously evolved to climb trees. What really stunned paleontologists is that the Nullarbor Plain in southwestern Australia, the site of the discovery, is a treeless shrub and was thought to be so even when the newly named Congruus kitchenneri jumped up and apparently climbed beyond its reach some 50,000 years ago.

This brochure, published by Murdoch University on March 23, 2021, shows the preservation of the skull of a newly identified fossil tree climbing kangaroo (Congruus kuhneri) from the Nullarbor Plain in Western Australia. (Photo / Agencies)

The most notable thing about near-perfect fossils was not that they belonged to 40-pound kangaroos that had mysteriously evolved to climb trees. What really stunned paleontologists is that the Nullarbor Plain in southwestern Australia, the site of the discovery, is a treeless shrub and was thought to be so even when the newly named Congruus kitchenneri jumped up and apparently climbed beyond its reach some 50,000 years ago.

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